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Watch Out For The Latest Scams on Facebook

Watch Out For The Latest Scams on Facebook image

Did you notice these scams on Facebook? Don´t get fooled by the top 9 most trending ones out there!

When Facebook announced it has reached one billion users this year, it became clear that not only does the social network provide exceptional opportunities for people to connect and share information; it also serves as a great platform for scammers. They hide behind special offers, exclusive content or new apps in order to obtain your username and passwords or to spread viruses and other malware. Scammers simply prosper in huge crowds and…news feeds.

Sometimes it is very difficult to recognize hoax, a deliberately fabricated false message presenting itself to be the truth, especially when it’s being shared by your friends on Facebook. These are very recent examples of viral scams, maybe you have noticed them in your news feeds yesterday…

Dont Get Fooled By Technical Legal Terms

“In response to the new Facebook guidelines I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times! (Anyone reading this can copy this text and paste it on their Facebook Wall. This will place them under protection of copyright laws, By the present communiqué, I notify Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, disseminate, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and/or its contents. The aforementioned prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents and/or any staff under Facebook's di­rection or control. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of my privacy is punished by law (UCC 1 1–308–308 1–103 and the Rome Statute). Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are recommended to publish a notice like this, or if you prefer, you may copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once, you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

This message encourages users to publish a Facebook privacy notice to stop the public use of material they post on the network. It may seem credible as it’s written in technical legal terms, but the truth is that by reposting this message, users have been spreading misinformation and cluttering news feeds with irrelevant content.

Only You Have Control Over Your Privacy Settings

The same applies for the following post asking Facebook users to help their friends hide their activity from the public. It claims that even people who are not in your friend list can access your information just by Liking or Commenting. But the truth is that only the person sharing content on Facebook has control over his own privacy settings.

“Attention all my contacts: With changes in FB, everyone can now access information from persons who are not in contacts. All that is needed is for this person who is not in your list of friends to comment or click on “like” to access your information. I do not want people that I have not selected as contacts on FB to access my information but I can’t change it myself…I ask you, therefore, to point the mouse on my name above (Don’t click), wait for the pop up, point the mouse again on “friends” (Don’t click). Then click on “settings” and remove the check mark in “Comments and Like”. Thus, my activity will no longer be in the public domain. Thank you!”

Top 9 Most Common Facebook Scams:

1. Find Out Who Has Been Looking at your Profile: this scam claims that it will show you who has been viewing your profile and who has blocked you from theirs, but none of these apps work because Facebook doesn’t provide such information to developers.

2. Free Items and Gift Cards: don’t expect to get anything for free just by completing a survey.

3. New Facebook Features: some apps promise to change your Facebook color or to provide you with a dislike button, but make sure you install them only from trusted and well-known developers.

4. Free iPads & iPhones: messages stating that you can win a free iPad or iPhone are usually just a thought-out marketing trick.

5. Free Facebook Credits: basically you shouldn’t trust anything that offers something for free. When it sounds too good to be true, you can be pretty sure it’s a scam, just like free credits for Facebook games like Farmville, Cityville etc.

6. Breaking News: scammers know that most users will click on a link promising exclusive coverage, so stay alert and if you are not sure, check with online media websites for the story first.

7. Help, I Need Your Help And Money: if you get a message from a friend saying he has been robbed somewhere abroad and he is left with no phone, passport or money and then asks you for help, beware – his Facebook account has probably been hijacked by scammers. You can verify this also by asking your mutual friends if they received an identical message.

8.Shocking Headlines and Fake Celebrity Stories: scammers also often use sensational news or false stories with a headline including words like “shocking” because Facebook users tend to share them without verifying the news.

9. False Privacy Settings: scammers mainly want to get your login details, so make sure to verify messages claiming to be from Facebook security. Even the examples above show that they can look very credible and trustworthy.

So the lesson to learn? Take control over your privacy settings and manage the privacy of your posts; always verify the information you receive and don’t spread messages just because they have been shared by your friends. You can also check for scams on specialized websites like FaceCrooks.com. As you may have noticed yesterday, anyone can swallow the bait – even George Takei. This is what he posted:

“From a friend, who reminds me that I need to check better before some of my own posts…“

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  • Dana L. Villa Chavez

    I have been scammed out of a LARGE amount of money by a person using Major Michael Wetzel on Facebook. I turned this over to the CID. Obviously, I believe Nigerian scammers took the real officer Wetzel's pictures off the internet and changed his name and rank. I ignored all red flags because this man had a way of making me fall in love with him. They are definately pros at what they do. I get a friend request almost daily by these people. Some names are Michael Cullen, Jake Cullen, Michael Kotkin, Jerry Kotkin. If any of these people or others give you the story that they are NEW to this....wife died
    of lung cancer, they have a child that family is helping them with because they are overseas don't believe them. Especially those serving in Afghanistan or Iraq.

  • Katlego Sedumedi

    There's nothing scarier than finding out that there's someone out there using your pictures and your name for a fake account, who knows what they do with that account, i really don't know what to do...

  • Doris Wiggins

    I would also like to tell you that I have been contacted by these scammers and I can give you their names and phone # where they contacted me from. They went through one of my good friends to contact me with a link to their website. I am not happy about the outcome and I would like these people caught and put out of scamming innocent people out of their hard earned money. Two of the scammers name they used was Roger Foster and Dean Fowler. Another person also said she had a name of Kelvin Anderson, that was given to her. They have an address in Camdenton, Mo and the phone # puts Michigan under the #. There are too many innocent people being contacted thru Facebook and I think there should and could be something done about this. This does not help Facebook. If it's that easy for these thugs to get thru to its FB users, something needs to be done and quickly before more people are scammed. They are not well educated, because their wording and spelling is awful. I have contacted my phone company because they interact with your phone also, so if we get enough people alerted to this, something can be done.
    I think they are from another country, which makes it even worse. They can't get out and make a decent living. This is their way of going thru life. God bless them on judgment day. I would like to be there when they get their dues and I'm not a vindictive person, but this?

    • Katlego Sedumedi

      They will pay one day. i am also a victim someone has created a fake account with my name and is using my pictures on the account, pretending to be me, who knows what they do with that account?

  • Donna Swaby

    A guy named "Luis Walter" (in London) contacted me and quickly "fell in love" with me. He was saying all the right things too...then he said his son had a brain tumor and he needed $35,000 "Jube Adafin" in London. I called him out on it. He said this Jube was his sons doctor and that is why the money was being wired to him. I told him to stick it. He then contacted me again and give me another wire name of Timothy Singleton in VA. He said to wire the money to him since I said Mr. Adafin was Nigerian. I played his little game and called him out about his FB page being so phony, the friends were phony, the pictures were phony....etc He got really mad and told me he could have me killed. Needless to say he didn't get the money!!!

  • Policracy Dean Dalil

    Prime Minister Sheikh Mohammed of Dubai who is a scam

  • Policracy Dean Dalil

    the latest scam is the prince of Dubai sheik Mohammad try to offer you a job and want you to send money to Ebola victim by western union. do not because he gives you every genuine and even the website is genuine. He is using the website of s prince to scam people on face book. warning !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This guys is good !! how can a prince ask you for money !!

  • Peggy Lancaster

    I had a women messenger me and suspected scam rightbaway but I was talking tonher and a fake Mark Z. When in told her I suspected shevwas scamming me she cursed and said we are millionaires and we don't need your money. if that was true then whynatbthe end of our conversation did she try to get me to send money to Fedex. I told herbif I won ishe would not be asking for money. she couldn't get off messenger fast enough
    Fake I'd but she used the name stacy Johnson

  • Carolyn Honeycutt

    Dont believe it when one of your friends say they won some how these people r hacking in on our friends messages pretending to be them im guessing thats why they ask for password on form some people r actually giving it to them make your friend call u on phone

  • Carolyn Honeycutt

    Omg just happened to me a old friend contacted of course it wasnt really my friend they said they seen my name on a list and i won money and they did to 200,000 and gave me a number and name the name was Francis james so i text and when they text back grammar was bad so i told my friend call me so i know it is really u at that point the person my "friend " said i cant im out of town getting new truck so i knew something was not right then the guy kept texting saying are u ready to fill form out i asked I asked what was on form he said I need your email password bad credit good credit and all kinds of crazy stuff that should not be needed so i decided to have someone that I know that does not use facebook or a computer say they seen their name on a list and sure enough person text back and said yes your name was on a list and kept saying this not fake long story short be ware cause it is not real i reported the person i even text him and said the scam is up so go get a job

  • Juanita Ellis

    I won a Facebook lottery just today I was informed. I send them 1200.00 and I get $100,000.00. The name on the
    Facebook page friend list is Smith Wayne. You send the money by Western Union to Moneke Sumpter, Brooklyn NY
    11207. Sounds too good to be true so I consider it false even I know someone who got the $100,000. I am her
    friend on Facebook.

  • Nico Jones

    Chic shimmers formally know as cutie booty bows is a scammer

  • Nico Jones

    There is a lady on here chic shimmers formally known ad cutie booty bow. She is a total scammer do not order from her she will take your money £157 in my case and you will get nothing in return this was a birthday present for my child please don't order here

  • Tina Cannon

    I received a msg yesterday from a Mrs.Susan Roberts. She said I had won $150.000 from Mr. Zuckerberg himself! Woohoo! Lol maybe in monopoly $!!! She was even nice enough to add a link for me to click on.
    People should be ashamed of themselves trying to scam people that don't have anything to start with! I hope "Mrs.Susan" sleeps well at night....I don't because I'm disabled not because I'm a horrible person taking advantage of innocent folks.
    If something sounds to good to be true, it probably is!

    • Kellz Garrett Garrett

      Mine said same thing used the name Clark Tracy and said she worked for fb. Said I won a fb lottery but I would have to send 170 for some stupid reason. She Said I had won 500,000 dollars and was acting antsy. Like she was waiting for a fix

  • Willy Gutheridge

    Facebook freedom lottery you have to pay $1000 to get your gift through UPS after you pay ,I don't think so. Plus you have to pay ups fees plus they dropped the cost to $500 then to what can I pay. When I said way can't I pay out of the winning's they said it's not the rules.

  • Carol Koenig

    I had the same thing happen to me she must have used Facebook to find my phone number, she text me and told me I won the lottery. It was for $200,000. Then she dropped a bomb. That I would have to pay $2000. For delivery fee. Her name is Linda Dowling, I traced it to Houston, Texas.

  • Hi ! Im one of those many people who have been bothered by this issue. Just a few days ago, a man starts chatting me up , congratulating me after he said my name was picked through a raffle and I had won US$50,000 and a car. He also sent me a picture of the cheque sealed tightly in a FedEx package ready for delivery. It bothers me because it sounds more like a scam and that it involves me sending a huge sum of cash to deliever the goodies. I totally need info that'll assure me of the nature of this so called raffle competition. Please somebody help !

  • Terri Hart

    i got an attempted scam too, beware of a profile called Donald Jack. its phony. the people r really african and the guy wants to marry u says hes in love with u than has u put your signature saying you'll marry him and than asks u to send him 4000 before he can come to the united states. i went along with him to find out what he was doing. i got his cell number and this little ring could be busted i'm sure. its a long story what he did but the documents he sent me to sign had misspelled words in them and were so obviously not a person really working at cybercoders construction which is a legitimate company but he fraudulantly represents himself as working there and has phony documentation for it. this is a terrible thing to do to people and i'm going to see what the police will do with this cell number, falsely representing a company, fake documents and trying to swindle women out of money. they probably have dozens of profiles set up but Don ald jack is a phony profile.

  • Carrie Carhart

    Today 7/16/2014, Just received a pm from a old facebook friend. She has not been on for awhile. "The poker company with association with face book is having lottery promotion for all the money we spend on login to Facebook.They use our profile name to enter for the lottery game and our name is among the winners.I got my money deliver to my door step just now ($150,000) and I also saw your name and your pics too on the agent list .Did they come to your home to deliver your own return winning money. I hope you have already get yours from them." I told her to call me, to make sure she is, who she claims to be. Even pm'd me a picture of the money in the bag. I told her to take a picture of herself, and then claimed to be at the bank..... Well, I really wasn't going to be fooled. Where do I report this?

  • Barbrarella Sillas

    I got the same think about 600,000 today I was excited but I know it was to good to be true!!! I am glad I came on this sight

  • Sandra Duncan

    Where do I need to report the scammed who want to start a romance real fast then want money? I am always getting approached by these people.

  • Lisa Gagnon

    New scam. Be aware of a Facebook scam. You receive a request from somebody who claims to be a Facebook employee to friend you. Mine was named Mark Woodruff, and he had a couple of official-looking photos on the site but NO HISTORY. Then, you receive something like the following (note the bad grammar) via PM: I am delighted to inform you that your name was luckily selected among the 12 lucky winners who won the sum of $600,000 Us dollars on the Facebook new online promo that was conducted by the Facebook officials in order to say big thank you to our users for making the Facebook social networking their ways of sending and receiving messages from their friends and family. Your name was selected by Automatic Random Machine, which your Facebook user name show up on number 7th from the 12 lucky listed names\

    At that point, I blocked them and reported them to Facebook. However, wouldn't you think that someone who blatantly claims to be an employee at FB would be prohibited from opening a page unless they were an actual employee?

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