Formulas Revealed: The Facebook and Twitter Engagement Rate

Formulas Revealed: The Facebook and Twitter Engagement Rate image

Tweet and Retweet were in a boat. Tweet fell out. Who was left? Retweet.

This popular Twitter joke is genius because it already includes an incentive to Retweet it! Social networks are mainly about sharing and engaging with content that´s why Socialbakers considers the Engagement Rate as the king of metrics. We decided to share the formulas with you so that you could understand this important metric better!

The Facebook Post Engagement Rate Formula

The Engagement Rate measures how well your Fans interact with your content. The Facebook Post ER formula takes into account Likes, Comments and Shares of the post to the total number of fans at the time it has been posted. Then it gets multiplied by 100 to get the final percentage that expresses how well your brand is doing in engaging your Fans!

The Tweet Engagement Rate Formula

The Tweet Engagement Rate takes into account the Replies and Retweets of the Tweet to the total number of Followers to date. Then it´s multiplied by 100 as well to provide you with the percentage of your Fan base that´s interacting with your Tweet.

And This Is What We Love To Do With It!

Choose The Period You Are Interested In And Watch Your Engagement Rate Evolve In Time

Monitor Your Daily Engagement Rate

Benchmark Your Performance With Your Competition Or Industry

Check Out Your Most Engaging Week Days…

…Your Most Engaging Time Of The Day…

…Your Brand´s Most Engaging Post Types…

…And Much More!

Sign up for a free 14-day trial with Socialbakers Engagement Analytics PRO to see how it works and to check out other Socialbakers metrics to understand how your brand is performing on Facebook and Twitter.

Comments Formulas Revealed: The Facebook and Twitter Engagement Rate

  1. Lindsey Sanford Schmitt (Social Media Analyst; Social Content Strategist at Bernard HODES Group) I think, much more accurate would be to take the number of total reach instead of fan base. You don't have to be a fan or a follower to interact with content on social platforms. And often, the users who do interact with you come from hashtags or referrals, and haven't yet converted. Additionally, you aren't reaching your entire fan base (especially on Facebook). When you measure by reach instead of fan base, you can start to see the direct impact of Edgerank, and even identify posts that might have hurt you.

    Lindsey Sanford Schmitt
  2. Lindsey Sanford Schmitt (Social Media Analyst; Social Content Strategist at Bernard HODES Group) I think, much more accurate would be to take the number of total reach instead of fan base. You don't have to be a fan or a follower to interact with content on social platforms. And often, the users who do interact with you come from hashtags or referrals, and haven't yet converted. Additionally, you aren't reaching your entire fan base (especially on Facebook). When you measure by reach instead of fan base, you can start to see the direct impact of Edgerank, and even identify posts that might have hurt you.

    Lindsey Sanford Schmitt
  3. Lindsey Sanford Schmitt (Social Media Analyst; Social Content Strategist at Bernard HODES Group) PS - you can get reach and impressions on Twitter from services like Simply Measured and TweetReach - and often for free.

    Lindsey Sanford Schmitt
  4. Tyš Síbrůková Hi Lindsey, that is an interesting approach and one that we have considered. We are always working to improve every aspect of our company and greatly appreciate the feedback! [Social Media Analyst]

    Tyš Síbrůková
  5. Jérôme de Beauvoir Bonjour Lindsey, I do agree but Tweetreach doesn't do more than adding the number of followers of the accounts who have twitted and eventually retweeted a tweet. I would be very interested by a tool letting us know what's the actual reach of a tweet... On Facebook, pages administrators actually have that information.

    Jérôme de Beauvoir
Engage 2014 New York by Socialbakers